Posts

  • A video about Python in Namibia

    Here is a nice video put together by Cardiff University and the Phoenix project:

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  • A simple evolutionary process in 40 lines of Python

    At PyCon Namibia I gave a talk entitled Rock, Paper, Scissors, Lizard, Spock with Python. I spoke about how it’s easy to compute equilibria of 2 player games with Nashpy but also spoke a bit about evolutionary stability. In this blog post I’ll go over how you can model a simple evolutionary process using about 40 lines of Python + Numpy.

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  • Scheduling class presentations using linear programming with Python

    My first year programming class culminates in a final week of group presentations. This is always a highlight of the teaching period as I get to see the awesome things my students have come up with. However, scheduling 30-40 group presentations every year could be a real nightmare. This is where mathematics comes to the rescue. I’ll describe in this post how I use linear programming implemented in the Python library Pulp to get the schedule easily.

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  • A linear algebraic implementation of support enumeration for the computation of equilibria using numpy

    Gambit is the leading piece of software for computing Nash equilibria of strategic games. A numpy of algorithms are implemented that take advantage of the higher dimensional geometry relating to the theory of games. In this post I will describe an approach for finding Nash equilibria (of 2 player games) that reduces to solving two simple Matrix equations. This can be implemented in Python using just numpy (and is already implemented in sagemath), I will also introduce (briefly) a library that does just that.

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  • Anscombe's quartert, variability and studying queues with Python

    Anscombe’s quartet is a great example of the importance of fully understanding variability in a data set: it is a set of 4 data sets with the same summary measures (mean, std, etc…), the same correlation and the same regression line but with very different distributions. In this post I’ll show how easy it is to play with Anscombe’s quartet using Python and then talk about another mathematical area where variability must be fully understood: the study of queues. I’ll do this with the Ciw python library.

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