Posts

  • A talk on computational game theory in Sagemath

    Today, Cardiff University, School of Mathematics students: James Campbell, Hannah Lorrimore as well as Google Summer of Code student Tobenna P. Igwe (PhD student at the University of Liverpool) as well as I presented the current game theoretic capabilities of Sagemath.

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  • Using the two thirds of the average game in class

    This past week I have been delighted to have a short pedagogic paper accepted for publication in MSOR Connections. The paper is entitled: “Playing Games: A Case Study in Active Learning Applied to Game Theory”. The journal is open access and you can see a pre print here. As well as describing some literature on active learning I also present some data I’ve been collecting (with the help of others) as to how people play two subsequent plays of the two thirds of the average game (and talk about another game also).

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  • On testing degeneracy of bi-matrix games

    We (James Campbell and Vince Knight are writing this together) have been working on implementing code in Sage to test if a game is degenerate or not. In this post we’ll prove a simple result that is used in the algorithm that we are/have implemented.

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  • Python, natural language processing and predicting funny

    Every year there is a big festival in Edinburgh called the fringe festival. I blogged about this a while ago, in that post I did a very basic bit of natural language processing aiming to try and identify what made things funny. In this blog post I’m going to push that a bit further by building a classification model that aims to predict if a joke is funny or not. (tldr: I don’t really succeed but but that’s mainly because I have very little data - having more data would not necessarily guarantee success either but the code and approach is what’s worth taking from this post… 😪).

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  • Code on cake, poker and a number theory classification web app

    I have just finished writing feedback and obtaining marks for my first year students’ presentations. These presentations follow 11 weeks during which students formed companies and worked together to come up with a ‘product’ which had to involve mathematics and code (this semester comes just after 11 weeks of learning Python and Sage). In this post I’ll briefly describe some of the great things that the students came up with.

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